Danish police 'ordered not to stop refugees arriving from Germany'

Denmark’s police chief says his officers have been ordered not to stop hundreds of refugees who have entered the country from Germany.

Jens Henrik Hoejbjerg said it was purely a police decision, adding that his officers “can’t detain foreigners who do not want to seek asylum (in Denmark)”.

Danish police 'ordered not to stop refugees arriving from Germany'

Many of the refugees say they want to go on to Sweden, Norway or Finland because they have relatives there or believe conditions for asylum-seekers are better.

Mr Hoejbjerg was speaking in response to reports that Danish police had closed road and rail routes from Germany

Under EU rules, people seeking asylum should do so in the first EU country they enter and not travel from one country to another.

Meanwhile, the head of the UN refugee agency in Jordan has accused donor countries of choosing the “cheap option” by failing to provide sufficient aid in Syria, leading to the migration crisis in Europe.

Andrew Harper said it would have been more cost-effective for the international community to spend more money in countries next to Syria, such as Jordan and Lebanon, where more than four million refugees found asylum.

Cash-strapped aid agencies have been forced to cut back support for desperate refugees in these countries, and more are now trying to reach Europe.

Mr Harper said Europe, the Gulf states and others “sought the cheap option, which was to provide us with peanuts in order to deal with the worst humanitarian situation for decades”.

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