Danish PM: We cannot accept an assault against Islam

The Danish prime minister today called Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas and assured that him the Danish government “cannot accept an assault against Islam", Abbas’ office said.

The phone call by Danish Prime Minister Fogh Rasmussen came after several days of protests across the Muslim world against cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, first published in a Danish newspaper.

This evening, Abbas “received a call from the Danish prime minister, expressing ... that his government cannot accept an assault against Islam, and that he personally respects Islam and he personally respects the dialogue between the religions,” Abbas’ office said.

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