Dangerous strain of bird flu confirmed on turkey farm in England

Dangerous strain of bird flu confirmed on turkey farm in England
File photo.

A dangerous strain of bid flu has been confirmed in turkeys at a farm in Lincolnshire, England.

Britain's Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) said the disease had been detected on a poultry farm near Louth.

Birds on the farm which have not already died will be culled in order to prevent the spread of the H5N8 strain, a type of highly pathogenic avian flu, Defra said.

In an update on the department's website it said: "We are taking immediate and robust action and an investigation is under way to understand the origin of the disease and confirm that there are no further cases."

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