Danes test out ski slope built on top of incineration plant

Danes test out ski slope built on top of incineration plant

Danish skiers and snowboarders are testing out an artificial ski slope above an incineration plant that does not emit toxins and rises 279ft above the flat landscape of Copenhagen.

The lower half of the slope at the Amager Resource Centre opened to the public on a snow-less Tuesday for two days of test runs to coincide with the week-long winter school holiday.

Eventually, the entire run will be divided into three slopes with a green sliding synthetic surface, plus a recreational hiking area and a 264ft climbing wall.

The 4 billion kroner (€535m) project, which sits on the roof of a plant that has been producing heating for homes since 1970, began in 2013.

It has been delayed by scandals, including alleged misuse of taxpayer money, and no opening date has been set.

The plant processes waste from 550,000 residents and 45,000 businesses and produces electricity and heating to about 150,000 households.

Once the project is completed, the roof will contain ski slopes, green spaces and hiking trails. The slopes will have ski lifts to take people to the top of the runs.

Denmark is famous for its flat landscape. Its highest point is in the west at Yding Skovhoej, which is 572ft above sea level.

- Press Association

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