Concern Worldwide condemns ‘heinous’ attack on UN aid convey in Aleppo

Concern Worldwide condemns ‘heinous’ attack on UN aid convey in Aleppo

International humanitarian aid agency, Concern Worldwide, has condemned the attack on a UN aid convoy delivering food relief, which killed at least 20 people yesterday and destroyed 18 trucks laden with supplies for civilians living in rebel-held Aleppo.

The agency, which is delivering aid to over 200,000 civilians in key locations inside Syria, said political leaders can no longer stand by and let war crimes go unpunished.

Conveying her outrage regarding the attack in Urum al-Kubra, Concern’s Regional Director for the Middle East & Asia Brid Kennedy said there was no excuse for bombs being dropped on aid convoys that were permitted to travel to civilians desperate for food and supplies.

"This heinous attack is a clear breach of international humanitarian law. Our thoughts go to the families of those brave humanitarians of the Syrian Arab Red Crescent (SARC), who were killed risking their lives to help those in desperate need.”

The UN has suspended all aid convoys heading into Syria in the wake of the attacks, a devastating blow to the progress that was made last week during the seven-day ceasefire that offered a glimmer of hope to ensure aid would be safely allowed to move in Syria.

“It appears we have taken two steps backwards on the path towards peace in Syria. This is simply shameful,” added Brid Kennedy.

Concern is delivering clean water and sanitation to over 200,000 civilians inside Syria as well as distributing food baskets with the support of local partners on the ground. It is also delivering humanitarian aid to a further 122,000 Syrian refugees in Turkey and Lebanon providing clean water and sanitation and food, through an e-voucher system.

CEO of Concern Dominic MacSorley who is attending the UN General Assembly in New York this week, added: “A ceasefire without safe access is largely meaningless. It is critical the UN investigate who exactly was responsible for this attack and hold them to account. World leaders meeting in New York must move with greater speed and try again to secure a peaceful and long-lasting solution to this never-ending war before more lives are needlessly lost.”

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