Children among dozens dead in missile attacks on schools and hositals medical facilities

Close to 50 civilians have been killed and many more wounded in missile attacks on at least five medical facilities and two schools in northern Syria, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said.

UN deputy spokesman Farhan Haq said that victims of the attacks included children.

He quoted the secretary-general when he called the attacks "blatant violations of international laws" that "are further degrading an already devastated health care system and preventing access to education in Syria".

Mr Haq quoted Mr Ban as saying the attacks "cast a shadow on commitments" made by nations seeking to end the Syrian conflict at a conference in Munich on February 11, which included a cessation of hostilities within a week and an end to attacks on civilians.

According to Médecins Sans Frontières, at least seven people were killed, and at least eight are missing, presumed dead, after a MSF-supported hospital in Idlib province in northern Syria was destroyed in an attack this morning.

The charity stated that hospital in Ma’arat Al Numan was hit by four missiles in two attacks within a few minutes of each other, according to staff from the hospital.

Around 15 other houses and structures located in populated zones were struck in the area, including reports of another non-MSF-supported hospital during the morning.

“The destruction on the MSF supported facility appears to be a deliberate attack on a health structure”, denounces Massimiliano Rebaudengo, MSF’s Head of Mission.

Five patients were killed, as well as one caretaker. In addition, a hospital guard was killed and eight members of staff are missing, presumed dead. Other patients are still missing, but their numbers are currently unknown.

“The destruction of the hospital leaves the local population of around 40,000 people without access to medical services in an active zone of conflict,” Massimiliano said.

More on this topic

Syria safe zones: what is driving the unexpected rapprochement between the US and Turkey?Syria safe zones: what is driving the unexpected rapprochement between the US and Turkey?

Militants pull out of key rebel town as Syrian troops push inMilitants pull out of key rebel town as Syrian troops push in

Holly Willoughby ‘honoured’ by interview with Syrian child refugeeHolly Willoughby ‘honoured’ by interview with Syrian child refugee

The world 'shrugs' as more than 100 people killed in airstrikes in Syria in 10 daysThe world 'shrugs' as more than 100 people killed in airstrikes in Syria in 10 days

More in this Section

Johnson to meet Trump, Macron and Merkel for Brexit and climate talks at UNJohnson to meet Trump, Macron and Merkel for Brexit and climate talks at UN

Labour faces Brexit policy battle at party conferenceLabour faces Brexit policy battle at party conference

Global youth protests urge climate actionGlobal youth protests urge climate action

Epstein accuser says Duke of York ‘knows the truth’ about sex claimsEpstein accuser says Duke of York ‘knows the truth’ about sex claims


Lifestyle

Gráinne Healy only started running regularly a few years ago. She’s already completed 50 parkruns. She tells Rowena Walsh what motivates her.Ageing with Attitude: Parkruns and quiet Friday nights

Against popular wisdom and flying a plane made from bamboo, wire and bike handlebars, a Co Antrim woman blazed a sky trail for aviation and for the independence of women, writes Bette BrowneMagnificent Lilian Bland blazed a trail for independence of women in her plane of bamboo

The epic battle for the bridge at Arnhem, as depicted in the blockbuster 'A Bridge Too Far', saw the Allies aim to end the war by Christmas 1944, but failed as a huge airborne assault force failed to take the last bridge across the Rhine. In an extract from his latest book 'A Bloody Week', Dan Harvey tells the story of one of the hundreds of brave men from Ireland who gave their all to the Allied campaignThe bridge to war: Dan Harvey's new book looks at the Irish who went a bridge too far

Several days ago, the long-awaited sequel to Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale was released.Lindsay Woods: I have always consumed books at a furious pace

More From The Irish Examiner