Charlie Gard's parents launch appeal after judge rules treatment should stop

Charlie Gard's parents launch appeal after judge rules treatment should stop

A couple whose baby son was at the centre of a High Court life-support treatment fight have launched an appeal.

Chris Gard and Connie Yates wanted to be allowed to take their son Charlie to America for a treatment trial but a High Court judge last month ruled against them.

The couple are now challenging Mr Justice Francis's decision in the Court of Appeal.

Court officials said on Wednesday that an appeal had been lodged.

Mr Justice Francis decided that doctors could stop providing life-support treatment for Charlie Gard on April 11 after analysing the case in a hearing at the Family Division of the High Court in London.

Charlie's parents, who are in their 30s and come from Bedfont, west London, had wanted a specialist in America to provide therapy.

Specialists at Great Ormond Street Hospital, where eight-month-old Charlie is being cared for, disagreed and said life-support treatment should stop.

Mr Justice Francis ruled in Great Ormond Street's favour and concluded that Charlie, who suffers from a rare genetic condition and has brain damage, should move to a palliative care regime.

Great Ormond Street bosses said treatment would continue until the couple had decided whether they wanted to challenge the judge's decision at the Court of Appeal.

Litigants who want to mount an appeal normally first make an application for permission to mount an appeal in writing to an appeal court judge.

If that written application is refused a litigant can ask to be allowed to make another permission application at a Court of Appeal hearing.

Appeal judges consider whether a litigant has a reasonable chance of success before allowing a full appeal hearing to be staged.

Mr Justice Francis heard that Charlie, who was born on August 4 and is nearly nine months old, had a form of mitochondrial disease, a condition which causes progressive muscle weakness and brain damage.

Specialists in the US had offered a therapy called nucleoside but the judge said experts agreed that the treatment could not reverse Charlie's structural brain damage.

Charlie's parents had appealed for money on a GoFundMe website to cover doctors' bills in the US and reached their £1.2 million target shortly before the High Court trial.

People have continued to give money despite Mr Justice Francis's decision and the fund has topped £1.3 million.

Mr Justice Francis said Great Ormond Street doctors had considered the experimental treatment but decided it would not help Charlie.

He said the case had never been ''about money''.

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