Boston marks five years since marathon attack with tributes

Boston marks five years since marathon attack with tributes
Medical workers aid injured people following an explosion at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon in Boston. Twin bombs near the finish line of one of the world's most storied races killed three people and injured 260 others, many of whom lost their legs, five years ago. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

Boston has marked the fifth anniversary of the deadly Boston Marathon bombings Sunday with a series of solemn remembrance acts.

Democratic Mayor Marty Walsh and Republican Gov Charlie Baker laid wreaths early in the morning at the spots along Boylston Street where two bombs killed three spectators and maimed more than 260 others on April 15, 2013.

One wreath was laid by Mr Baker in front of Marathon Sports as bagpipes played in the background.

In another spot, the family of victims Martin Richards and Lu Lingzi were comforted by Mr Walsh as another wreath was placed where the second bomb went off by the Atlantic Fish restaurant.

Hundreds of silent people gathered to watch behind barricades.

Both Mr Baker and Mr Walsh addressed address families and survivors at a private ceremony inside the Boston Public Library.

Jane and Henry Richards, family members of the youngest victim, Martin Richard, and members of the family's foundation, also spoke.

The family of Martin Richard, from left, Bill, Jane, Henry and Denise, walk down Boylston Street following a ceremony at the site where Martin Richard and Lingzi Lu were killed in the second explosion at the 2013 Boston Marathon, Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Boston. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)
The family of Martin Richard, from left, Bill, Jane, Henry and Denise, walk down Boylston Street following a ceremony at the site where Martin Richard and Lingzi Lu were killed in the second explosion at the 2013 Boston Marathon, Sunday, April 15, 2018, in Boston. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

"On April 15, 2013, our city changed forever but over the last five years, we have reclaimed hope. We have reclaimed the finish line and Boston has emerged with a new strength, a resilience rooted in love," Mr Walsh said.

At 2:49pm, a citywide moment of silence will be observed, and the bells of Old South Church will be rung to mark the moment five years ago when the first bomb exploded.

Sunday is One Boston Day, devoted to blood drives and acts of kindness.

Security is tight for Monday's 122nd running of the race.

- PA

More on this topic

After the Boston bombs: Out of hate came loveAfter the Boston bombs: Out of hate came love

Man who helped police arrest Boston marathon bomber dies aged 70Man who helped police arrest Boston marathon bomber dies aged 70

Boston bomber to seek new trialBoston bomber to seek new trial

Boston Marathon bomber sentenced to deathBoston Marathon bomber sentenced to death

More in this Section

Woman killed and suspect shot at home of Tarzan actor Ron ElyWoman killed and suspect shot at home of Tarzan actor Ron Ely

Trump: Turkey-Syria-Kurds face-off is not America’s fightTrump: Turkey-Syria-Kurds face-off is not America’s fight

Campaigners to launch bid to ban UK Government from putting Brexit deal before MPsCampaigners to launch bid to ban UK Government from putting Brexit deal before MPs

Woman found dead in apparent homicide at home of Tarzan star Ron Ely; Suspect shot deadWoman found dead in apparent homicide at home of Tarzan star Ron Ely; Suspect shot dead


Lifestyle

Food news with Joe McNamee.The Menu: All the food news of the week

Though the Killarney tourism sector has been at it for the bones of 150 years or more, operating with an innate skill and efficiency that is compelling to observe, its food offering has tended to play it safe in the teeth of a largely conservative visiting clientele, top-heavy with ageing Americans.Restaurant Review: Mallarkey, Killarney

We know porridge is one of the best ways to start the day but being virtuous day in, day out can be boring.The Shape I'm In: Food blogger Indy Power

Timmy Creed is an actor and writer from Bishopstown in Cork.A Question of Taste: Timmy Creed

More From The Irish Examiner