Blood test ‘may detect ovarian cancer up to two years earlier’

Blood test ‘may detect ovarian cancer up to two years earlier’

A blood test may detect ovarian cancer up to two years earlier, researchers in Belfast said.

Scientists developed a simple screening method involving a biomarker made up of four proteins seen together.

The study, published in the journal Nature, involved the analysis of blood samples from 80 individuals across a seven-year period.

Around half of ovarian cancer cases are picked up at a late stage, when treatment is less likely to be successful

Dr Bobby Graham from the School of Biological Sciences at Queen’s University Belfast and lead author of the study said: “Firstly, we discovered that the presence of the biomarker panel will enable us to detect EOC (Epithelial Ovarian Cancer).

“We then developed a screening test to detect this biomarker panel, making this a relatively simple diagnostic test.

“The algorithm designed will screen the blood sample and flag any abnormal levels of the proteins associated with the cancer.

“The screening test identifies ovarian cancer up to two years before the current tests allow.”

If diagnosed at stage one of EOC, there is a 90% chance of five-year survival compared to 22% if diagnosed at stage three or four.

Dr Graham added: “The results of this study are encouraging, however, we now want to focus on testing it in a wider sample set so that we can use the data to advocate for an ovarian cancer screening programme.”

The research was carried out in partnership with the University of New South Wales Australia, University of Milan, University of Manchester and University College London.

Dr Rachel Shaw, research information manager at Cancer Research UK, said: “Around half of ovarian cancer cases are picked up at a late stage, when treatment is less likely to be successful. So developing simple tests like these that could help detect the disease sooner is essential.

“At Cancer Research UK, we’re working hard to find new ways to detect cancer early and improve the tests already available. It’s really exciting to see these encouraging results for this type of ovarian cancer.”

The project was jointly funded by the Eve Appeal charity and Cancer Research UK.

Athena Lamnisos, CEO of the Eve Appeal says, “We are extremely proud to have part funded the PROMISE programme, which brought together experts for a 7 year project to try and diagnose ovarian cancer at an earlier stage.

“Sadly, so many women are diagnosed late, to devastating effect. We are hopeful the outcomes of this project will have a positive affect on women in the future.”

- Press Association

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