Baby P clinic whistleblower to sue British health service

Baby P clinic whistleblower to sue British health service

A senior doctor who claimed Baby P could have been saved if her warnings had been heeded is suing Britain's National Health Service (NHS) for compensation, it was revealed today.

Dr Kim Holt raised concerns about the child development clinic at St Ann’s Hospital in Tottenham, north London, where the little boy was seen just two days before his death in 2007.

The consultant paediatrician and three colleagues warned in 2006 that the clinic – run by Haringey Primary Care Trust but with doctors employed by Great Ormond Street Hospital Trust – was understaffed and had a “chaotic” appointment system which was a risk to patients.

Dr Holt alleges she was forced out of her job and suffered a nervous breakdown, and is seeking up to £100,000 (€119,251) in a personal injury claim against Great Ormond Street, The Times has reported.

Baby P, now named as Peter Connolly, was just 17 months old when he died in a blood-spattered cot in Tottenham, north London, on August 3 2007.

He had suffered more than 50 injuries despite being on the at-risk register and receiving 60 visits from social workers, police and health professionals over eight months.

A locum doctor at the St Ann’s child development clinic allegedly failed to spot that he was suffering abuse when she examined him two days before his horrific death.

Great Ormond Street Hospital said in a statement: “The trust has received a solicitor’s letter and will respond in due course. It is not able to discuss possible future litigation.

“As a result of issues raised by Dr Holt, the trust conducted an internal independent investigation, which was then followed by an external independent investigation by NHS London.

“The latter reported in December 2009 and concluded that Dr Holt’s concerns in 2006 were taken seriously, that she was not targeted for raising those concerns, and that Great Ormond Street Hospital should organise further workplace mediation to enable Dr Holt if possible to return to her original role.

“The trust accepted these recommendations and has been trying to facilitate that workplace mediation between Dr Holt and colleagues in Haringey.

“Key staff must be able to work together and that is what mediation is seeking to achieve.”

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