Argentine man accused of keeping his wife and autistic son in cage for years

Argentine man accused of keeping his wife and autistic son in cage for years

An Argentine man kept his wife and autistic son in a filthy cage during the day for at least two years, police say.

Prosecutor Alejandro Pellegrini said police found the dirt-floor cell at the house of 66-year-old Eduardo Oviedo in the city of Mar del Plata.

They were acting on a complaint by two of his other children.

Mr Pellegrini said Oviedo’s 61-year-old wife has psychiatric problems and his 32-year-old son is autistic.

He described the cell as a cage with bars and an iron door that was locked from the outside. Old mattresses, rubble and bricks, as well as pet food, were found inside.

“The house also had a room in the worst of human conditions where the woman and son spent the hours of the night,” locked up as well, he said.

Oviedo was arrested on Friday and brought before a judge on Saturday. He declined to make a statement. Mr Pellegrini said he would undergo psychiatric evaluation.

The prosecutor said that several other children lived nearby but did not denounce the situation for fear of their father.

More in this Section

Brexit delay still possible, Tusk tells UK MPs preparing to vote on Johnson’s dealBrexit delay still possible, Tusk tells UK MPs preparing to vote on Johnson’s deal

US troops leaving Syria ‘cannot stay in Iraq’US troops leaving Syria ‘cannot stay in Iraq’

Trudeau wins second term as Canadian prime ministerTrudeau wins second term as Canadian prime minister

Police sending officers to US to interview suspect in Harry Dunn deathPolice sending officers to US to interview suspect in Harry Dunn death


Lifestyle

We catch up with Bushmills’ master distiller, who tells Sam Wylie-Harris more about this liquid gold.Irish whiskey masterclass: 11 things you need to know

Temples, beaches, and several nations with new names.From Bhutan to Costa Rica, Lonely Planet reveals its top countries to visit in 2020

Columnist and trained counsellor Fiona Caine offers guidance to a woman who’s unsure how to manage her mother’s dying wishes.Ask a counsellor: ‘Is it appropriate to notify my mother’s friends of her death by email?’

‘The Big Yin’ talks to Luke Rix-Standing about living with Parkinson’s, the power of forgiveness, and why he will never, ever stop swearing.Billy Connolly: ‘You don’t wake up famous, you wake up scratching yourself like everybody else’

More From The Irish Examiner