American freed 'for now' in Zimbabwe after twitter jibe at Robert Mugabe

American freed 'for now' in Zimbabwe after twitter jibe at Robert Mugabe
Martha O' Donovan. Picture: Getty

A Zimbabwean court has freed "for now" an American woman charged with subversion for allegedly describing former president Robert Mugabe on Twitter as a "sick man".

Martha O'Donovan, from New Jersey, had faced up to 20 years in prison.

A magistrate removed her from remand after prosecutors failed to provide a trial date, freeing her from the charges but only temporarily.

Ms O'Donovan's lawyer Obey Shava said she can still be summoned back to court if the prosecution feels it has more evidence against her.

But she can get her passport back.

"It all depends on what they gather but for now the case has crumbled. She is free for now," said Mr Shava, with the organisation Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights.

In previous cases, the government has rarely followed up to summon people again.

A smiling Ms O'Donovan, looking relieved, said she had no comment and left the courtroom to hugs from friends.

She has denied the allegations of insulting 93-year-old former leader Mr Mugabe, who resigned in November under pressure from the military and ruling party amid fears his unpopular wife was positioning herself to succeed him.

New President Emmerson Mnangagwa, a longtime Mugabe ally whose firing as vice president sparked the whirlwind events leading to Mr Mugabe's departure, has declared that the southern African nation should let "bygones be bygones".

Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights says it has represented nearly 200 people charged under a law that criminalises insulting or undermining the president.

The military rounded up eight activists for carrying placards denouncing Mr Mnangagwa during a church service presided over by the president.

A court on Tuesday released them after ruling that the military had no arresting powers.

AP

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