Accuser says she was not paid to speak about allegation against US politician

Accuser says she was not paid to speak about allegation against US politician

A complainant has said she was "absolutely not" paid to speak publicly now about her alleged sexual encounter with US Senate candidate Roy Moore when she was 14.

Leigh Corfman was the first woman to publicly accuse Mr Moore of sexual misconduct since his nomination by the Republican Party for Alabama’s US Senate seat.

Mr Moore has denied the historical allegations.

Ms Corfman told NBC’s Today Show on Monday that she decided against going public previously because she was afraid that her children would be shunned in Alabama, where Mr Moore became a state judge.

Ms Corfman says she agreed to share details only after The Washington Post sought her out and gave her assurances she was not the only one accusing Mr Moore of misconduct.

She told NBC: "My bank account has not flourished. If anything it’s gone down because I’m not working."

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