Abbas: Palestinian state ready to end Israel claims

Abbas: Palestinian state ready to end Israel claims

The Palestinians are ready to end all historic claims against Israel once they establish their state in the lands occupied in the 1967 Six-Day War, President Mahmoud Abbas said.

In an interview with Israeli TV, Mr Abbas did not elaborate on which demands he would relinquish, but traditionally Palestinians have demanded the right of refugees to return to their homelands in Israeli territory.

Mr Abbas also said negotiations with Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu remained his preferred choice, but he would consider other options if talks broke down over Israel’s continued settlement expansion.

Negotiations were relaunched by the US last month, but quickly faltered over Israel’s refusal to extend a curb on Jewish settlement construction. Mr Abbas says there is no point negotiating as long as settlements take over more land claimed by the Palestinians.

The Palestinians want to establish a state in the West Bank, Gaza and east Jerusalem, captured by Israel in 1967. Israel has withdrawn from Gaza, but about half a million Israelis have settled in the other war-won areas.

Mr Netanyahu wants the Palestinians to recognise Israel as a Jewish state, and said earlier this week he might extend a curb on settlement construction in exchange for such recognition. A 10-month-old moratorium on West Bank housing expired in late September and Mr Abbas has said he will not return to negotiations without an extension.

The Palestinians argue that it is not up to them to determine the nature of the state of Israel. Mr Abbas noted that Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organisation recognised each other in 1993, saying this should be sufficient. Mr Abbas heads the PLO.

However, in an apparent attempt to reach out to Israeli public opinion, he said that once the Palestinians had established their state in the 1967 borders, “there is another important thing to end, the conflict, and we are ready for that, to end the historic demands”.

Asked about options if talks collapse, Mr Abbas said the Palestinians might turn to the United Nations Security Council to seek recognition of their state.

“All the options are open, but we don’t want to use all of them right now. We are focusing on resuming direct talks,” he said.

He said that for the time being, he has not considered resigning or dissolving the Palestinian Authority, his self-rule government which has limited control over about 40% of the West Bank.

Mr Abbas defended his decision not to resume talks until Israel curbed settlements, noting that the international community was unanimous in its demand for a settlement freeze.

“When (President Barack) Obama came to power, he is the one who announced that settlement activity must be stopped,” Mr Abbas said. “If America says it and Europe says it and the whole world says it, you want me not to say it?”

Since the start of negotiations, Mr Abbas said he spent about 25 hours talking to Mr Netanyahu directly and that they spoke freely.

Mr Abbas said that when he appealed to Mr Netanyahu to halt settlement building, the Israeli leader, who heads a centre-right coalition with several pro-settlement parties, told him his government would fall.

“I told him this is a historic opportunity for you that we sign a peace agreement,” Mr Abbas said. “I am afraid if we can’t do it these days, the opportunity will be lost.”

In other developments yesterday, Mr Netanyahu said Israel had resumed indirect talks with the Hamas rulers of Gaza about swapping hundreds of Palestinian prisoners for a captive soldier held for more than four years.

The German mediator who has been working to broker a deal to bring home the soldier for about a year had returned to the region, Mr Netanyahu said. The soldier was captured in 2006.

In northern Gaza, an Israeli air strike killed two militants.

The Israeli military said its air force targeted a squad of militants preparing to fire rockets at Israel.

The militants’ affiliation was not immediately known, but they did not appear to be connected to Hamas or any other major group since there was no claim of responsibility.

The Israeli military said more than 165 rockets and mortars have been fired at Israel from Gaza so far this year.

More on this topic

Tánaiste set for visit to Middle EastTánaiste set for visit to Middle East

John Broich: A slice of history - Ever wondered why there is no Kurdish nation?John Broich: A slice of history - Ever wondered why there is no Kurdish nation?

Video raises questions about fatal shooting of Palestinian by Israeli troopsVideo raises questions about fatal shooting of Palestinian by Israeli troops

Israeli leader vows to annex West Bank settlement enclaveIsraeli leader vows to annex West Bank settlement enclave

More in this Section

East Africa hit by most serious locust outbreak in 25 yearsEast Africa hit by most serious locust outbreak in 25 years

Farage accuses Government of being embarrassed by Brexit over Big Ben farceFarage accuses Government of being embarrassed by Brexit over Big Ben farce

Louvre closed amid strikes over pension plans in ParisLouvre closed amid strikes over pension plans in Paris

Tommy Robinson video admissible in football banning order case – judgeTommy Robinson video admissible in football banning order case – judge


Lifestyle

So I’ve booked my holidays. And before you ask, yes, I’m basing it around food and wine. I’ll report back in July, but I thought readers might be interested in my plan should you be thinking about a similar holiday.Wines to pick up on a trip to France

Esther N McCarthy is on a roll for the new year with sustainable solutions, cool citruses and vintage vibes.Wish List: Sustainable solutions, cool citruses and vintage vibes

They have absolutely nothing really to do with Jerusalem or indeed with any type of artichoke, so what exactly are these curious little tubers?Currabinny Cooks: Exploring the versatility of Jerusalem artichokes

Arlene Harris talks to three women who have stayed on good terms with their ex.The ex-factor: Three women on staying friends with their former partner

More From The Irish Examiner