A rare 'super blue blood moon' wil light up sky tomorrow night ... but not in Ireland

A rare 'super blue blood moon' wil light up sky tomorrow night ... but not in Ireland

Skygazers in certain parts of the world can look forward to an "unusual" celestial event tomorrow night (Wednesday) when a Super Blue Blood Moon rises in the sky.

The bad news is that anyone in Ireland hoping to see a lunar eclipse will have to jump on an aeroplane.

The eclipse, according to Nasa, will be "extra special" for those in the US and other parts of the world such as the Middle East, Asia, eastern Russia, Australia and New Zealand, where the Blue Moon will coincide with a total lunar eclipse.

Blue Moons are defined as the second full moon in a calendar month and this one will also be a supermoon, meaning the Earth's natural satellite will appear about 14% bigger and 30% brighter in the sky as it reaches its closest point to Earth.

Dr Gregory Brown, an astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich, said the moon will rise at about 5pm and will remain in the sky until 8am the following morning.

He said: "It will be high in the sky from about 19:00 and will be at its highest, and thus best, time at around 00:40.

"This coming full moon is unusual in that it is the second full moon of the month, when typically there is only one full moon per calendar month.

"Also, the full moon will be slightly larger than normal given that this is also a supermoon, so astrophotography will be more spectacular than normal."

Nasa said: "While the Moon is in the Earth's shadow it will take on a reddish tint, known as a 'blood moon'.

"With the total eclipse, it'll be a royal spectacle indeed: a 'super blue blood' Moon."

For those keen to see a lunar eclipse in Ireland, Dr Brown advises putting July 27 in the diary for "a more spectacular view" of the event.

- Press Association & Digital Desk

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