56 killed in wave of Iraq blasts

At least 56 people have been killed and more than 200 others injured in a wave of bombings across Baghdad and nearby towns, Iraqi officials said today.

More than a dozen attacks – mostly car bombings – highlighted increasing sectarian tensions in Iraq a decade after the war began.

The attacks came on the eve of the anniversary of the US-led invasion, which started before dawn on March 20 2003.

One of the deadliest of the attacks hit near a main gate to the heavily-fortified Green Zone, which houses major government offices and the embassies of several countries, including the United States and Britain.

Police and hospital officials provided the casualty toll.

More on this topic

Navy Seal acquitted of murder in killing of captive in IraqNavy Seal acquitted of murder in killing of captive in Iraq

Protesters block president’s route over Iraqi ferry sinkingProtesters block president’s route over Iraqi ferry sinking

Dozens dead as ferry sinks in Tigris near MosulDozens dead as ferry sinks in Tigris near Mosul

More than 200 mass graves linked to Islamic State terror found in IraqMore than 200 mass graves linked to Islamic State terror found in Iraq

More in this Section

Boris Johnson to tell Merkel and Macron there must be new Brexit dealBoris Johnson to tell Merkel and Macron there must be new Brexit deal

Dozens feared dead or wounded after explosion at Kabul wedding hallDozens feared dead or wounded after explosion at Kabul wedding hall

Detectives given extra 36 hours to quiz suspects in death of police officerDetectives given extra 36 hours to quiz suspects in death of police officer

Teenager on murder charge after lawyer stabbed to death in UKTeenager on murder charge after lawyer stabbed to death in UK


Lifestyle

Katarina Runske owns Anna B’s bookshop in Schull, Co Cork. She is originally from Stockholm in Sweden and also owns and runs Grove House restaurant and rooms in the West Cork village.We Sell Books: ‘It is a great lifestyle and I am very fortunate’

Five things for the week ahead with Des O'Driscoll.Five things for the week ahead

From Liverpool’s beat-pop to Bristol’s trip-hop, Irish writer Karl Whitney explains the distinctive musical output of individual cities in the UK, writes Marjorie Brennan.Sounds of the City: The musical output of individual UK cities

As landlords’ enclosures of villages and commonages during England’s industrial revolution drove landless countrymen into the maws of the poet William Blake’s “dark Satanic mills”, a romantic nostalgia for the countryside began to grow.Damien Enright: Great writers took inspiration from walking

More From The Irish Examiner