300 ducklings vaccinated against deadly disase

Ducklings in the care of the Scottish SPCA are being vaccinated to protect them from potentially fatal "duck plague".

So far around 300 birds have been vaccinated with the help of Inglis Vets, which arranged to have the medication imported from Hungary.

Duck viral enteritis (DVE), also known as the duck plague, is contagious and potentially fatal for ducks, geese and swans if contracted.

Last year more than 530 ducklings were vaccinated.

The Scottish SPCA said the ongoing vaccination programme has so far been going well.

National wildlife rescue centre manager Colin Seddon said: "The vaccination is proving successful as we haven't experienced the disease amongst the ducklings in our care so far.

"The medication required to protect ducks from this disease is imported from Hungary and Inglis Vets have kindly supported us with not only sourcing the vaccination but also helping administer it, at no cost to the society.

"This kind of support is invaluable and we are incredibly grateful for Inglis Vets for helping us protect the ducklings and helping us ensure they have the best chance of survival once released back into the wild."

Ronnie Soutar from Inglis Vets said: "When we found out the Scottish SPCA was having difficulty getting hold of the vaccine, we were more than happy to step in and offer our help by arranging to have it imported from Hungary, which is something only those with a registered veterinary practice can do.

"Duck viral enteritis is both contagious and potentially fatal for ducks, geese and swans if contracted. Like children starting school, lots of little ducklings gathered in one place would be susceptible to infection if not vaccinated.

"It's extremely important to prevent this nasty disease from spreading, so we look forward to seeing the happy, healthy ducks being released in due course."



Related Articles

Paul O’Grady heartbroken after death of pet dog and TV star Olga

Watch: Miami nightclub closed after woman rides horse on dancefloor

Latest: ISPCA calls for animal welfare course to be taught in primary schools

WARNING: Cuteness through the roof as orphaned hare receives TLC at Kildare wildlife hospital

More in this Section

Chemically altered soil could be used to build homes in developing nations

Anti-depressants and bladder drugs linked to increased risk of dementia

Former police officer suspected of being serial killer is charged with murder

George H W Bush feeling alert and out of intensive care


Lifestyle

New father’s life ‘changed forever’ after he was run over by surgeon

The biggest cancer killer will take your breath away

Hopefully she had an idea...

Power of the press: Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks discuss 'The Post'

More From The Irish Examiner