Letters to the Editor: Caherciveen people could end direct provision

Letters to the Editor: Caherciveen people could end direct provision

Direct Provision since its inception in 1999, under the Minister for Justice, John O’Donohue, has been a documented disaster.

However, the situation back in his hometown of Cahersiveen now is truly shocking. Over 120 people were moved here to The Skellig Star Hotel from centres in Dublin in March to minimise the spread of Covid 19. Since then, more than 22 people have tested positive in The Hotel.

The people in the hotel are part of our community, and under the protection of The Irish State. Under our protection. They are scared for their lives and have asked to be moved out. I’’m scared for them but I’m also angry.

We, as a State, have failed in our duty to protect under The 1951 Covenant related To The Status of Refugees. Cahersiveen welcomes people, we need people, because our demographics are scary and diversity is good.

The residents in the Hotel have a right to safety, their lives, their full potentials, to contribute to their communities with dignity. They didn’’t escape persecution to live it here. I believe there is a valid case here in relation to their treatment and Covid 19. Rousseau comes to mind, "Man is born free but everywhere he is in chains"

The States responsibilities are ours, as citizens. It is The Social Contract. Let’’s fulfill it not privatise it. Direct Provision is Irelands Magdelan Launderies. We know this now and cannot plead ignorance in the future.

The Minister in Cahersiveen started Direct Provision in 1999, The people in Cahersiveen could end it. Wouldn’t that be justice?

Deborah Birmingham, 2 Heatherfield, Boherboy, Cahersiveen, Co. Kerry

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