Letter to the Editor: Cows should have same right to life that we have

Letter to the Editor: Cows should have same right to life that we have
A young Holstein Friesian Bull pauses while grasing near Garrettstown, Co. Cork, Ireland. Picture: David Creedon / Anzenberger

The world’s disarray brings into view the disharmony of the meat industry.

The huge numbers of animals bred for beef are compounding the damage we are doing to our environment at an unsustainable rate, while contributory carbon emissions are leading to global warming and rising seas.

The mass killing of defenceless animals is barbarity. How can anyone look them in their eyes and not begin to question why? The pain and torture inflicted on these docile animals is termed humane, but it is slaughter. They are killed so we can make cottage pies, steaks, sausages, and hot dogs. Even the entrails and tongues are eaten. What do the slaughterhouses do with the cows’ sad eyes?

People’s colons are but graveyards for decaying animal parts.

We’re told to eat dairy because it will make us grow up big and strong, but perhaps the hormones pumped into the animals are making us sick. Surely, people realise how quickly a calf grows over the typically six months it is milk-fed? This might explain human conditions such as acne, rosacea, spots, and blood clots, cardiac arrest, lumps in the breast, and all the rest.

How can we be so numb to the pain of another living being? A cow is not a beef wellington — it’s a brother, a sister, a mother; a fellow Earth dweller. I wish I’d stopped eating meat much sooner. Eating healthy veggie burgers, soya, or Quorn won’t leave a mother forlorn.

God created all the animals, just as he did you and me. He gave us senses to live harmoniously beneath his big blue sky: To smell, to touch, to see, to be. All sentient beings have a right to live freely. Cows show love and understanding, they make bonds and connect, they communicate (but people are oblivious to it). They can recollect and show intellect, feel pain and fear. They give us so much that they should be revered. Sadly, the opposite is often the case. What’s worse is there is absolutely no need for us to slaughter them and we have absolutely no right to take their precious lives.

So, please try to live cruelty-free and help curtail the rising seas. Lower your cholesterol! Try vegan or vegetarian; it really doesn’t matter if you’re an octogenarian. Work out: You’ll be amazed at how good it feels. You may even start to feel a deep compassion that’ll never go out of fashion. Live kindly. Be nice. Protect biodiversity and our environment. Protect what’s right.

Nothing on this planet is more violent than the meat industry, but, ultimately, the killing comes down to your food choices.

Be a voice for the voiceless animals.

Adrian Nally

Caher

Glencorrib

Shrule

Co Mayo

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