Odious practice: Social media cruelties

Odious practice: Social media cruelties

It is hard to think of too many things that became as powerful, as ubiquitous, in such a short time as social media engagement. 

It is hardly an exaggeration to say social media has changed how we communicate, understand, and relate to each other. Neither is it an exaggeration to suggest this evolution will continue and make unknown unknowns every day.

These empowering developments are not, because humans are human, without a darker side. 

One came to light when a mother of an autistic boy was forced to highlight spreading online cruelty. She pointed to a practice where people challenge each other to make fun of people on the autism spectrum. 

That the vast majority of people would hardly conceive of such an idea much less indulge it is as reassuring as the fact that a feral minority participate in it is disturbing and unacceptable.

We are at the very early stages of understanding how social media might be policed to protect everyone, not just the vulnerable, but surely no-one needs a rulebook to understand that this odious, demeaning practice cannot be tolerated?

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