Letter to the Editor: What does lack of public toilets say about Cork?

Letter to the Editor: What does lack of public toilets say about Cork?
The lack of public toilets in Cork City shows a contemptuous disregard for an essential public need, says our letter writer. Picture: Dan Linehan

Now that Cork City is so well represented in the new Government might it be possible for them to see to it that the most basic human requirement for public conveniences is provided for a population now approaching a quarter of a million?

English councils have been heavily criticised for ‘only’ running an average of 15 toilets per 12,500 citizens (The Guardian June 27.) If we were so provided in such a miserly fashion we would, proportionately, have over 200; but how many do we have? The answer is NONE; yes you non-Corkonians, you read it right: the second city of one of the richest states in the world does not provide a single public convenience.

The same article continues, “Britain’s lack of public toilets says so much about our country”.

So what does the contemptuous disregard for an essential public need say about our political representatives? When the Cork Business Association approached the council about this outrage, their spokesperson said: “There is no one size fits all solution to this issue.”

Dermot O’Dowda

Blackpool

Cork City

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