Letter to the Editor: Ireland can be a ray of light in an intolerant world

Letter to the Editor: Ireland can be a ray of light in an intolerant world

I came to Ireland around 4 years back. I clearly remember the first day here, as soon as I landed I realized the air around had a specific aroma of purity. Everything looked beautiful.

It goes without saying I was scared,it was my first time travelling alone and that too outside my home country. I passed the immigration with no hassle.

I took cab to hotel and on the way all I could think of was how beautiful this country is.

Next day was Sunday and I went out for a walk around the canal, I have been here for last 4 years now and have traveled a lot around Ireland and other countries all over but there is nothing more peaceful and soothing then that walk.

I was surprised to see how people smiled at you when they passed by, just as a sweet gesture of greeting.

I fell in love with this country then, its people, its beauty, its culture.. Days have passed by and everyday there are things that make me fall more in love with this country because you cannot find these gestures and beauty anywhere else in world like how people make conversations with the bus drivers when they get in, how they greet them when they get in and walk out of bus, how when you give way to someone on the road they acknowledge it by thanking you, how when I fly to Dublin and have to pass though Irish immigration they receive me by saying 'Welcome Home'.

Trust me its most compassionate thing that you could say to someone who is living far away from their family and country.

'People make a country great' When the whole world is moving towards intolerance, Ireland is a ray of hope for whole world.It can set an example of acceptance, tolerance and love for all the nations around the world.

When I talk to some of my friends in another countries or back home and they mention Ireland, it makes me feel proud, I feel the same way that I feel for my birth country.

In India we have a saying in Sanskrit - Workland is greater then birth land.

A person owes more to its work land then to its birth land. For me this is true, because I have got so much love here that it became my home I came to Ireland for 6 months because I wasn't sure of how will I survive away from my people, my country and my family but with time this country became my country, its people are my people and friends that I made here are my family.

Mahak Jhamb

Waterloo Road

Dublin

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