Deportation order blocked: Let’s be decent

Deportation order blocked: Let’s be decent
Brothers Zubair is in fifth year, Umair is in transition year and Mutjuba is in second year at Coláiste Éamann Rís School, Cork. Pic Michael Mac Sweeney/Provision

It must be welcomed that five siblings who have been living in direct provision while attending school or college in Cork for a number of years will not be deported.

Hamza, Zubair, Umair and Mutjuba Khan, their sister Shazadi, and their parents Mubeen and Hina were denied international protection and faced immediate deportation.

However, a last-minute intervention after pressure from, among others, the boys’ school, lifts that threat.

It is easier to resolve individual cases than it is to reach a national policy position on immigration that meets the concerns of all — especially as they are often in conflict.

That 200 Clonmel residents signed a petition to try to block a Muslim cultural centre, including prayer rooms, is an example of that conflict.

That their appeal was rejected by An Bord Pleanála seems to honour the old principle of céad míle fáilte, one so many Irish immigrants relied on in the past when they arrived on foreign shores.

Immigration is a reality and we can deal with it honourbly and in a decent way or we can sow the seeds of catastrophe.

It’s a no-brainer really.

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