Consent courses extended: Why the need?

Consent courses extended: Why the need?

Any welcome for the news that college consent classes will be rolled out to secondary schools and sports clubs must be tempered by a question or two: Why are they necessary? How have we reached a point where our young people need guidance on this most basic self-discipline?

Is it because our older people — their parents — have failed in their duty to teach their children how to behave, how to respect others? Are they, like the fallen woman in JG Farrell’s Siege of Krishnapur “so intoxicated as to be unavailable to the voice of her conscience”?

It seems questionable too that this basic training be sublet to schools and teachers, no matter how committed or caring they may be.

These courses were launched four years ago and more than 4,000 students have taken one. They have been exposed to a definition of consent known as OMFG — ongoing, mutual, and freely given.

These courses may seem progressive but they point to a deeper malaise — parenting that does not equip young people to survive in today’s world by behaving in a civilised way.

We may need parenting courses as well.

More in this Section

Would you stand up to an oppressive regime or would you conform? Here’s the scienceWould you stand up to an oppressive regime or would you conform? Here’s the science

Fine Gael squandered chance to be a new natural party of governmentFine Gael squandered chance to be a new natural party of government

Tony Spollen was an unwitting yet vital cog in exposing rotten heart of banking cultureTony Spollen was an unwitting yet vital cog in exposing rotten heart of banking culture

Cope needs extra €30m a year: A cry for helpCope needs extra €30m a year: A cry for help


Lifestyle

We know porridge is one of the best ways to start the day but being virtuous day in, day out can be boring.The Shape I'm In: Food blogger Indy Power

Sheila O’Flanagan can’t pin down an exact number of books she has written.First lady of fiction: Sheila O'Flanagan is happy to be accessible

This might not be the most entertaining topic but it is that time of year when colds, flus and nasty bugs enter classrooms and homes.Mum's the Word: Top tips for keeping nasty bugs and illnesses at bay

Laura Whalen is a Munster-based dollmaker and mother-of-five, and the founder of the Bábóg project, a community crafting drive to make a commemorative doll for all the babies born in Irish mother and baby homes.Made in Munster: Meet the West Cork dollmaker who uses bio-degradable materials for her craft

More From The Irish Examiner