Confronting climate change - Change comes step by step

Confronting climate change - Change comes step by step

It is extremely difficult for an individual who hopes to make a proportionate and worthwhile contribution to trying

to avert climate change to believe that their actions, their changed behaviour, can have a real impact. 

That challenge is deepened when governments all too often seem deliberately off the pace and more interested in appeasing business lobbies than taking steps towards confronting our unsustainable consumption.

Today we publish suggestions, some easily realised, others less so, for those who wish to play a greater part in what is the greatest challenge facing humanity. Plastics, fashion, diet, travel — especially air travel — and shockingly wasteful and unnecessary. Plastic bottles are mentioned, but so too is what could be the most powerful measure of all. 

At a moment when so many of the world’s political systems seem to be imploding, it is difficult to argue that the best way to bring change is by informing yourself on the issues and engaging with the democratic process — but it is. After all, if you cannot ask those who hope to win public office relevant and informed questions, the issues will not get the attention they demand.

The Government has been encouraged to limit the use of wood and peat-burning stoves because of the pollution they produce. Once, in the recent past, advocated as energy-efficient alternatives to open fires, this change in perspective on simple, comforting stoves shows the scale of change needed.

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