7 things to know about the World Wide Web as it celebrates 30 years

7 things to know about the World Wide Web as it celebrates 30 years

March 12 marks a significant milestone in British technology with the 30th anniversary of the World Wide Web.

In 1989, working at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, known as CERN, Sir Tim Berners-Lee submitted a proposal for information management that would go on to transform the way people communicate and consume information.

Here are some interesting facts about the World Wide Web:

– The World Wide Web was developed out of frustration

Sir Tim invented the World Wide Web because he was frustrated to have to constantly log on to a different computer every time he wanted to access different information not on his main computer.

– ‘Vague but exciting’

Sir Tim’s boss at CERN, Mike Sendall, left three short but powerful words when he first received the proposal paper for the World Wide Web: “Vague but exciting.”

At the end, he simply said: “And now?”

– The World Wide Web is not the same as the internet

The World Wide Web and the internet are wrongly confused as the same thing – something Sir Tim is quick to correct people on.

The internet, which is a network of networks formed of computers, existed long before the World Wide Web.

WWW is the transfer of information, whether it be text, documents or other rich content like videos.

– The World Wide Web was almost called something completely different

Sir Tim considered a number of name options before settling on World Wide Web.

Among the contenders were Mine of Information, The Information Mine and Information Mesh.

– The first website just explained what the World Wide Web was

The first web page, defining what the Web is, did not go live until August 6, 1991.

A copy of it can still be viewed today: http://info.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html

– The first web browser was also called WorldWideWeb

Years before the Internet Explorer, Sir Tim also created the first web browser, which went by the same name, WorldWideWeb.

– You can still see how the Web looked originally

Developers and designers at CERN recently rebuilt the original browser, allowing people to experience the World Wide Web as it was first intended.

Anyone can try the browser out by visiting https://worldwideweb.cern.ch.

- Press Association

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