Wimbledon doubles joy for Kubot and Melo after marathon five-set final

Wimbledon doubles joy for Kubot and Melo after marathon five-set final

Lukasz Kubot and Marcelo Melo won their first grand slam doubles title together by edging a marathon five-set men's final at Wimbledon.

Poland's Kubot and Brazilian Melo came from behind to beat Austria's Oliver Marach and Croatian Mate Pavic 5-7 7-5 7-6 (7/2) 3-6 13-11 after four hours and 40 minutes on Centre Court.

The deciding set alone lasted an hour and 43 minutes, with a 10-minute break at 11-11 while the roof was closed finally prompting a breakthrough.

By the end, the contest was just 21 minutes short of the longest ever men's doubles final at Wimbledon - the 1992 title match won by John McEnroe and Michael Stich.

Kubot and Melo had already spurned two match points at 6-5 in the final set but after re-emerging from the roof delay they won eight out of the next nine points to seal victory.

Melo, who will return to world number one in the doubles rankings on Monday, adds another major title to the one he secured at the French Open in 2015.

Kubot also becomes a two-time grand slam champion after he won the Australian Open doubles title in 2014.

Melo said the win was the biggest of his career.

"For sure. Here at Wimbledon, everybody, especially Brazilians, knows how much I want to win this tournament," he said. "The year I won the French Open, I said my focus was to win here.

"Of course the French Open is a very special tournament, especially for us Brazilians because of Guga (three-time singles champion Gustavo Kuerten).

"But I have to say Wimbledon is Wimbledon, the tournament I dream about since I was young. I said many times this year my main focus was to play the best here. I did all the preparations to play the best here. I'm really glad to be able to do it."

Upon sealing victory, Kubot kicked up his legs in a can-can style dance for the crowd before running up through the stands to the players' box with Melo.

They jumped up and down with supporters in a scrum in scenes not often witnessed at Wimbledon.

Their opponents seemed more downbeat. Marach sat with a towel on his head before he was dragged up by his team-mate, prompting huge cheers from the crowd.

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