Watch Zolani Tete make history with the fastest knockout ever in a world title boxing match

Watch Zolani Tete make history with the fastest knockout ever in a world title boxing match

Zolani Tete has set a boxing record for the fastest ever knockout in a world title bout.

The 29-year-old South African made history and retained his WBO bantamweight crown by knocking Siboniso Gonya unconscious with his first punch, leading the referee to call time on the fight in just 11 seconds – watch carefully or you’ll miss it.

Tete’s remarkable punch on Gonya’s chin broke a record which has stood since 1994, when Daniel Jimenez stopped Harald Geier in 17 seconds to remain the WBO super bantamweight champion.

Gonya received medical treatment in the ring after the remarkable fight at the SSE Arena in Belfast, eventually returning to his feet but requiring an oxygen mask.

(Liam McBurney/PA)
(Liam McBurney/PA)

It’s a record which will take some beating.

Elsewhere in the bouts at the stadium in Northern Ireland, Filipino Jerwin Ancajas beat Belfast’s own Jamie Conlan with a sixth-round stoppage, retaining the IBF World Super Flyweight Title.

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