WATCH: Kolo Touré calls to young fan’s house for a cuppa and a kickabout

WATCH: Kolo Touré calls to young fan’s house for a cuppa and a kickabout

It’s easy to see why Kolo Touré is nicknamed the ‘‘nicest man in football’.

The easygoing Ivorian may make Liverpool supporters nervous when he's in defence, but he is open and friendly to fans and always comes across as being thoroughly down-to-earth.

So when Kolo popped round to meet Isaac, a Liverpool-mad nine-year-old, he made himself right at home - even joining the young fan in a chorus of the famous ‘Yaya-Kolo’ chant.

A kickabout with one of your heroes followed by a cuppa and a singsong - what an afternoon for young Isaac.

The two discussed everything from the footballer’s youth to the meaning of life.

And fair play to Touré, he even helped do the dishes.

Although he looked absolutely gutted that training meant he couldn’t tuck into the cream cakes.

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