Upwardly mobile Tweed suits Haggas

Upwardly mobile Tweed suits Haggas

Harris Tweed will head to his winter quarters as a stayer to note after dominating every yard of the Listed Noel Murless Stakes at Newmarket today.

William Haggas realises there will be many potential suitors for his colt, who took the step up to a mile and six furlongs with aplomb for a three-length defeat of Ship's Biscuit.

He was beaten in the Bahrain Trophy and more comprehensively in the Great Voltigeur Stakes, but this was nonetheless a fourth success of a busy season and the plaudits were shared with jockey Liam Jones, who delivered a notably cultured ride.

The 5-4 favourite belongs to the trainer's father Brian, who owns the majority of the mills in the Outer Hebrides which make the Harris Tweed cloth.

"He's just a lovely and very able horse," said Haggas junior.

"His style of running means he gives himself a serious race every time and I'd like to call it a day now and bring him back for the Ormonde Stakes next May.

"There'll be plenty wanting to get hold of him for jumping and for Australia, but we'll see next year."

It was a low-key opening to the three-day Cambridgeshire meeting and the feature was the Group Three Group Three Somerville Tattersall Stakes, a race with a mixed strike-rate for producing future stars.

It provided an opportunity for Rerouted (8-1) to live up to the expectations of Barry Hills and the trainer will have admired his tenacity as he pinched the lead back from Surrey Star.

Hills said: "I thought he would win the nursery at Newmarket and he didn't, then I really fancied him at Doncaster but he didn't win there either.

"I knew he was better than a horse rated 89 and I was keen to run him today.

"Michael (Hills, son and jockey) said he wasn't concentrating at the end and could have won a length.

"His half-brother Critical Moment is a good miler and the Horris Hill is a possibility. We'll see how he is in 10 days' time."

Several adjustments by Bryan Smart have seen Tangerine Trees (9-1) advance far beyond his previous guise as a 70-rated sprint handicapper to Listed honours in the Newsells Park Stud Golden Bonus Rous Stakes.

Tom Eaves broke smartly and managed to scrape over the line a neck in front of Tax Free.

Barry Matthews, one of the members of the Tangerine Trees Partnership, said: "As he showed at Beverley last time, putting on a visor and dropping him back to five furlongs has transformed him.

"All credit goes to Bryan, and Tom for an excellent ride."

It proved to be a terrific day for Yorkshire representatives, as firstly the Tim Easterby-trained Mariachi Man (10-1) held on to the Weatherbys Nursery by a nose and a neck from Indigo Way and Poplin.

Jockey David Allan said: "He's a very big horse and we'll be expecting good things from him next year.

"Although he was seventh at Doncaster last time he was only beaten a length and it was the first time he had a proper race."

Easterby was on the wrong end of a head-bob to the European Breeders' Fund Fillies' Handicap, with Midnight Martini going down to Amitola (14-1) from David Barron's Thirsk operation.

The NGK Spark Plugs EBF Maiden Stakes was chock-full of interesting newcomers but they were all found out by Godolphin's Auden (13-2).

Although beaten at long odds-on at Brighton last time, he returned to the form of his debut second on the July course.

"It's horses for courses," said Godolphin racing manager Simon Crisford.

"He likes to get his toe in - he didn't like it at Brighton."

Jamie Spencer, who rode Amitola, doubled up on Dance And Dance (33-1) in yet another tight finish to the Racing UK Sky 432 Handicap.

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