Stephen Kenny set for executive role in FAI restructure

Stephen Kenny set for executive role in FAI restructure
The role of Stephen Kenny, promoted from U21 manager in April, has expanded into international football director. Photo: INPHO/Ryan Byrne

Stephen Kenny is to have a place on the FAI’s executive team in a broader role but there’s no room for Niall Quinn under restructuring plans unveiled to staff today.

Following a thorough review by interim chief executive Gary Owens and human resources consultant Yvonne Clancy, the executive team will reduce from 14 to nine from August.

Four of those department head roles will be advertised internally, with the incumbents invited to reapply for their posts.

They include Fran Gavin (League of Ireland), Tom O’Shea (grassroots), Mark Russell (marketing), and Rea Walshe (operations).

Ruud Dokter (High performance), Barry Gleeson (international), Alex O’Connell (finance) will be joined by new senior team boss Kenny at the top table, along with a candidate to fill the HR vacancy.

The role of Kenny, promoted from U21 manager in April, has expanded into international football director.

No longer part of the executive team will be the directors of communications and facilities, nor the deputy chief executive.

Quinn took on that position when joining the crisis-ridden organisation in January alongside Owens but the terms of the state bailout deal brokered later that month questioned the necessity for such a role.

It is expected that the former Ireland striker will apply to take over the marketing function, now containing the commercial portfolio, or the League of Ireland brief.

Owens, in his address to the 197 staff, vowed to establish a new department tasked solely with the League of Ireland.

In cases where roles cannot be found within the new structure and redeployment isn’t possible, what’s being described as ‘Voluntary Parting Terms’ will be on offer on an individual basis.

Given low- to middle-income employees were guaranteed security of employment for at least 18 months under the government’s bailout terms, senior management personnel appear to be most in danger.

Staff were informed that the deferment of salaries announced in March just as Covid-19 was wiping out sport across Europe will remain until external assistance was forthcoming or the financial outlook improved.

Employees were subject to a tiered deferral scheme, from 10 per cent to 50 per cent dependent on salary levels.

Owens has not ruled out applying to become the permanent chief executive, as his temporary deal is due to lapse in a fortnight.

The salary on offer will be €207,590, under half of what John Delaney was paid at the height of his 14-and-a-half-year tenure.

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