Six months on, another Rio Olympic pool has turned an intriguing colour

If the Olympic diving pool turning green didn’t put people off swimming, a practice pool turning orange most certainly will do.

Since the closing of the 2016 Rio Olympic and Paralympic Games back in September, many facilities have fallen victim to a lack of maintenance, not least the aquatic centre.

A lack of interest from potential new operators has led to many venues and arenas being closed, a disappointment for the local residents who had hoped to benefit from them.

The Olympic diving pool famously turned a concerning shade of green during the Games, and it was eventually revealed that an unauthorised dump of 80 litres of hydrogen peroxide was responsible.

But that was nothing. These images show the discoloured practice pool, which is said to be due to mud, insects and rainwater. The result is an ugly visual reminder of the reality of Olympic legacy – the problem is widespread.

(Silvia Izquierdo/AP)

The Olympic golf course saw excellent competition during the Games, including Justin Rose’s gold medal performance, but has since failed to attract enough customers willing to part with their cash. The result is closure.

Course architect Gil Hanse told Golf World: “We are hopeful that this is another example of having to hit a low point before things get better.”

(David Davies/PA)

The famous Maracana stadium, host of two World Cup finals (1950 and 2014), has been one of the worst affected since the Paralympic closing ceremony.

Brazil’s landmark venue hosted both the men’s and women’s Olympic football finals, but has since been broken into and vandalised.

(Silvia Izquierdo/AP)

The Rio de Janeiro Football Federation released a statement, saying: “The worries over the present and the future of the stadium are only increasing,” while the Guardian reported that in January the stadium’s power was cut off due to unpaid bills.

(Mario Lobao/AP)

Furthermore, the pitch has seen better days, having been reportedly ravaged by worms.

(Silvia Izquierdo/AP)

The stadium enjoyed around £400 million of investment ahead of the 2014 World Cup, but has seen only a smattering of matches since the Games came to an end.

So much for Olympic legacy.


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