Shane Lowry admits rules farce at US Open did affect his play

Shane Lowry has admitted that the rules fiasco during the US Open final round at Oakmount affected his play more than it had initially been reported.

The world number 25 held a four-shot lead going into the final round before he shot a closing 76 to finish three shots behind eventual winner Dustin Johnson.

Uncertainty over the possibility of Johnson receiving a one-shot penalty for causing his ball to move on the fifth played a significant role on the Irishman's mindset during the final stretch.

Shane Lowry admits rules farce at US Open did affect his play

"I did my interviews afterwards and I said it didn't affect me at all," Lowry said at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational press conference. "But when I look back on it, it did.

"The few days after the U.S. Open were quite tough. Anytime I was on my own, I was thinking what if I had done this, or if this would have happened, and I was driving myself mad.

"He might have got away with that penalty shot if he really needed to. I mean, it would have been interesting to see if the two of us had been tied, or I would have won by one, whether Dustin would have got penalized that shot or not," he said. "I think we might have had a different scenario then."

Lowry has been paired with last year's runner-up Bubba Watson and Japan's Hideki Matsuyama for the first two rounds of the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational at Firestone Country Club, with Johnson alongside the man he succeeded as US Open champion, Jordan Spieth, and 2013 winner Justin Rose.

More in this Section

Football rumours from the mediaFootball rumours from the media

Champions League holders Liverpool suffer first-leg loss at Atletico MadridChampions League holders Liverpool suffer first-leg loss at Atletico Madrid

A rare experience for this Liverpool ties up second leg deliciouslyA rare experience for this Liverpool ties up second leg deliciously

‘Happy’ Kerr reveals talks with FAI's Roy Barrett‘Happy’ Kerr reveals talks with FAI's Roy Barrett


Lifestyle

THE number of children with mental health issues presenting to the paediatric emergency department in Temple Street has increased dramatically, according to a study by Dr Eoin Fitzgerald.Learning Points: Light at the end of the tunnel for mental health?

Cooking in the MasterChef kitchen is just as scary as you’d imagine, writes Georgia Humphreys.Sweet 16 as Masterchef returns

Martin Hayes doesn’t like to stand still. The fiddle virtuoso from East Clare has made it a hallmark of his career to seek out creative ideas from beyond his musical tradition.Martin Hayes: Breaking new ground

At this point, if we are talking about a collective consciousness and how to move forward, lets go back to basics and talk about what we teach our children and what we were taught ourselves, writes Alison Curtis.Mum's the Word: Children remind us, in a world where we can be anything, be kind

More From The Irish Examiner