Senior GAA players afflicted by gambling addiction says players union boss

Senior GAA players afflicted by gambling addiction says players union boss

Gambling addiction is now the biggest problem afflicting senior GAA players according to the boss of the players' union.

Gaelic Players' Association chief Dessie Farrell told the Irish Independent that the gambling addiction crisis in the GAA is "devastating" families of inter-county players.

Mr Farrell has said that the GPA's confidential counselling service helped 74 inter-county players deal with various issues last year.

And the GPA is now setting up an awareness programme, using players who have come through the problem themselves.

High profile players such as Armagh's Oisin McConville and Offaly's Niall McNamee have helped the issue by going public with their own personal struggles with gambling.

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