Killorglin RFC opens its doors for eagerly anticipated History Night

Killorglin RFC opens its doors for eagerly anticipated History Night
The Killorglin RFC team that won the McElligott Cup in the 1932-33 season.

There will be more than a nod to former glories for Killorglin RFC on Saturday night when the club gathers for an eagerly anticipated History Night at the Old Forge pub.

Founded in 1885 and pre-dating even a GAA team in the town, rugby has been something of a stop-start affair for Killorglin but things are currently on the up with the senior team, coached by Andrew Eadie and captained by Luke O’Shea, flying at the top of Munster Junior League Division 3, unbeaten after four games and having this season regained the McElligott Cup for the first time since 1932-33.

The Killorglin RFC team that followed in the footsteps of the 1932-33 team in winning the McElligott Cup.
The Killorglin RFC team that followed in the footsteps of the 1932-33 team in winning the McElligott Cup.

Saturday’s event kicks off at 7pm with an introduction from club president Colm Conway as the club looks back to the existence of a rugby team in the town from 1885-88, 1927-36, 1975-81 and from 1999 to the present day.

The 1927-36 era was Killorglin’s most successful, during which time the club won the Lenihan, McElligott and Galwey Foley Cups, also reaching the Munster Junior Cup final. The Galwey Foley was won for a second time with victory over rivals Castleisland in 1979 and the current team is at the forefront of a rejuvenation that sees Killorglin RFC field teams from Under-8 to senior level and boasts a thriving girls membership.

Saturday’s History Night at the Old Forge, which was the clubhouse in the 75-81 era will have amidst lots of memorabilia the McElligott Cup, won two weeks ago with a 31-15 victory over Killarney, on display, as well as an original jersey from 1927, once worn by Tom Langan, who was a member of the 1932-33 cup-winning team.

The club is hoping for a strong attendance and all are welcome to the Old Forge.

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