Reebok apologise for Ireland t-shirt branded a ‘stupid, divisive idea’

By Stephen Barry

Reebok have apologised for an ‘Ireland’ t-shirt which omitted the six counties of Northern Ireland and removed it from sale on its website.

The t-shift was part of the sports clothing giant’s UFC range, pushed out ahead of the UFC Fight Night Dublin event that takes place this Saturday.

The €23 t-shirt placed a 26-county map of Ireland between the words ‘Ireland UFC’.

Reebok apologise for Ireland t-shirt branded a ‘stupid, divisive idea’

John Kavanagh, head coach of the SBG martial arts facility and former MMA fighter, publicly threatened to withdraw his gym from the deal with Reebok before the apology was issued.

Kavanagh, whose girlfriend is from Belfast, was particularly annoyed by the web tagline asking fans to ‘show your UFC territorial allegiance with this UFC Ireland map tee’.

Reebok put the mistaken t-shirt down to a ‘design error’ as they apologised for the offence caused.

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