Phil Neville questions USA’s ‘etiquette’ over hotel visit

Phil Neville questions USA’s ‘etiquette’ over hotel visit

Phil Neville has described United States team staff visiting England’s hotel ahead of the Women’s World Cup semi-final between the sides as “not etiquette”.

Lionesses boss Neville has stressed “it’s not something that England would do”, while also saying the incident is “not a concern”.

PA understands at least one member of the US team’s staff was in England’s hotel on Sunday while Neville and his players were out training.

Neville’s side face the holders on Tuesday at Lyon’s Groupama Stadium, which is also the venue for the final five days later.

When asked about the incident, Neville said at his pre-match conference: “It’s not a concern.

“The only thing I would say is it’s not something that I would want my team ops person doing.

“It’s not something that England would do. We’re happy with our hotel. We were training. So I hope they enjoyed the hotel, but it is not something that we’d do, send somebody round to another team’s hotel.

I just thought 'what are they doing?' It's not etiquette really, is it?

“But it’s their problem. I’m sure that Jill (Ellis, the USA boss) probably wouldn’t have been happy with that arrangement; I wouldn’t have been if that was my team ops person going round, and I’m sure that she will be dealing with their infrastructure within their own discipline, probably.

“It’s not an unfair advantage. It’ll have no bearing on the game. I actually found it quite funny. I just thought ‘what are they doing?’ It’s not etiquette really, is it?

“I just think that’s not something I would allow from our organisation.”

At her press conference prior to Neville’s, Ellis was asked if she could explain why staff had gone to the hotel, and whether looking at it as a place the team could potentially stay if they reached the final was a sign of arrogance.

USA head coach Jill Ellis played down the incident (Nick Potts/PA)
USA head coach Jill Ellis played down the incident (Nick Potts/PA)

Ellis said: “I would assume everybody is doing that, you have to plan ahead.

“The only two people that think of planning ahead on my team is my administrator, because she has to book all the flights and everything and do all that stuff, and her boss, and everybody else, we don’t worry about that. So that’s probably who the two people were.

“I think that’s important, to do your job. So in terms of arrogance, I think that’s got nothing to do with us. That’s planning and preparation for our staff. So I think that’s pretty normal.

“I had no idea where we were headed and where we were going, I didn’t even know how we were going to get here yesterday. They think of that so we don’t have to.”

- Press Association

More on this topic

Paying the penalty: England’s spot-kick miseryPaying the penalty: England’s spot-kick misery

Neville reveals admiration for ‘world-class’ US star RapinoeNeville reveals admiration for ‘world-class’ US star Rapinoe

‘We’re not arrogant’ insists US head coach Ellis after Krieger claims‘We’re not arrogant’ insists US head coach Ellis after Krieger claims

Neville says a World Cup semi-final defeat for England ‘would represent failure’Neville says a World Cup semi-final defeat for England ‘would represent failure’


More in this Section

Patrick Hoban targets 100 goals as he signs deal to stay at Dundalk until 2021Patrick Hoban targets 100 goals as he signs deal to stay at Dundalk until 2021

TJ Doheny says he is ready for rematch with Danny RomanTJ Doheny says he is ready for rematch with Danny Roman

Jonny May recalls how missing night out led to England debut as he approaches 50th capJonny May recalls how missing night out led to England debut as he approaches 50th cap

Judge adjourns court case that could see Bury Football Club wound upJudge adjourns court case that could see Bury Football Club wound up


Lifestyle

Can you imagine Spanish churros, Moroccan tagines or even Christmas cakes without its fragrant taste?MIchelle Darmody: Warm smells of cinnamon

Rachel Howard visits the South Moravia region to sample this eastern European country’s finest tipples.They’re big on beer but could the Czech Republic be raising a glass to wine tourism too?

Lisa Salmon catches up with a cardiologist, who explains how a patient’s own stem cells can repair damage from heart disease and heart failure.How stem cells are mending broken hearts

Hannah Stephenson discovers America’s dark past and Martin Luther King’s vision for its future by following the civil rights trail.Charting America’s path to freedom on a road trip through the Deep South

More From The Irish Examiner