Partnership with LIT 'a win for all concerned', says Limerick's John Cregan

Partnership with LIT 'a win for all concerned', says Limerick's John Cregan

The home of the reigning All-Ireland senior hurling champions will be known as the LIT Gaelic Grounds from the outset of this year’s inter-county championships.

A naming rights agreement has been made with nearby Limerick Institute of Technology as part of a wide-ranging partnership, which will see the Limerick County Board earn €30,000 per annum for the next 10 years.

In what is believed to be the first of its kind, the deal will see dedicated scholarships provide to Limerick GAA club members who attend LIT as well as internships and work experience for LIT students in sports coaching, event management, marketing and other areas.

LIT will also provide support for clubs as well as use of their campus facilities for Limerick teams and administration.

As well as holding the naming rights, the use of the grounds will be made available to LIT students as a “Living Lab” for educational and other purposes.

It comes as Limerick GAA plans to improve the Ennis Road venue and transform it into a plaza-types area, which will be opened up to the community.

Announcing the partnership, county board chairman John Cregan said: “I am very excited about what we and LIT are doing together.

"This partnership helps bring Limerick GAA to another level. We are on an exciting trajectory and this partnership reflects that new energy and vibrancy.

“LIT and ourselves are close neighbours on the Northside of the city, and we are very much building on the shared history of our two bodies here.

By partnering like this, we are reaching into each other’s communities, unlocking a range of benefits for Limerick, for our clubs and for students.

“This is a far deeper relationship than a typical commercial one, and brings with it huge benefits that a conventional commercial relationship simply could not deliver.

"It is a win for all concerned and we look forward to working together for the benefit of all.”

More on this topic

Liam Cahill happy to keep his distanceLiam Cahill happy to keep his distance

Cahill keen to help deflated Déise find their mojo againCahill keen to help deflated Déise find their mojo again

Limerick's Paul Browne retires from inter-county hurling Limerick's Paul Browne retires from inter-county hurling

Seamus Hickey hopes technology comes to aid of refereesSeamus Hickey hopes technology comes to aid of referees

More in this Section

We’ll take the point and move on – Maddison looking ahead after Norwich setbackWe’ll take the point and move on – Maddison looking ahead after Norwich setback

Wilder highlights McGoldrick’s all-round value to Blades amid goal droughtWilder highlights McGoldrick’s all-round value to Blades amid goal drought

Frank Lampard will not haul Chelsea in for extra training amid poor runFrank Lampard will not haul Chelsea in for extra training amid poor run

Officials to probe '30-man brawl' in Munster's loss to SaracensOfficials to probe '30-man brawl' in Munster's loss to Saracens


Lifestyle

Last week, en route to La Gomera in the Canary Islands, I decide to stop off in Tenerife and take the 1.2km cable car ride to the top of Mount Teide, 3,660m above sea level. Cable cars are invariably an exciting way to travel.Dursey Island is a special place because of its remoteness

It can be considered offensive by some but generally the word ‘tinker’ is not considered rude says the Traveller’s advocacy group Pavee Point. Over time the term became synonymous with ‘Traveller’ and it is this which is current today.The Islands of Ireland: Tinkering with the past on Tinker’s Island in West Cork

Dr Naomi Lavelle explores some questions about walking upside-downAppliance of Science: Could humans copy insects' ability to walk upside-down?

Emer Corridan is the general manager at the award-winning four-star, Cahernane House Hotel in Killarney, Co. Kerry.You've Been Served: Emer Corridan, general manager at Cahernane House, Killarney

More From The Irish Examiner