Caster Semenya starts ‘new journey’ by joining South African football team

Caster Semenya starts ‘new journey’ by joining South African football team

Two-time Olympic 800m gold medallist Caster Semenya appears to be preparing for a career outside of athletics after joining a women’s football club.

The 28-year-old is currently appealing against a decision by the Court of Arbitration for Sport which approved the IAAF’s introduction of a new testosterone limit for female athletes.

Semenya is unable to defend her 800m world title in Doha later this month without taking hormone-suppressing drugs, something she has refused to do.

And the South African has started training with Gauteng-based women’s football club JVW with a view to making her debut next season as the transfer window is currently closed.

“I am grateful for this opportunity and I appreciate the love and support I already get from the team,” she told the club’s website.

“I am looking forward to this new journey, and hopefully I can contribute as much as I can to the club.”

Club founder and South Africa captain Janine Van Wyk said: “I am absolutely honoured that out of all the other women’s clubs around the world, she has chosen JVW as the club where she would like to start showcasing her football skills.

“I welcomed her at her first training (session) with the team on Tuesday and was impressed to see that she definitely has all the fundamentals.”

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