Oosthuizen 'in shock' after Open win

Oosthuizen 'in shock' after Open win

Open champion Louis Oosthuizen today admitted it could take a week for his amazing victory at St Andrews to sink in.

Oosthuizen was a 200/1 outsider at the start of the 139th Open Championship, but ended up leaving the world's best golfers trailing in his week with a stunning display.

The 27-year-old South African carded rounds of 65, 67, 69 and 71 for a 16-under-par total and stunning seven-shot winning margin over world number three Lee Westwood, with Paul Casey, Rory McIlroy and Henrik Stenson a shot further back.

After 12 holes of the final round Oosthuizen was 17 under par and in sight of the record low score in major history - 19-under-par set by Tiger Woods here in 2000 - but with the Claret Jug effectively secured, he could simply concentrate on enjoying becoming the fourth South African Open champion after Bobby Locke, Gary Player and Ernie Els.

"It was unbelievable," admitted Oosthuizen. "After the 12th it became a bit difficult, having such a big lead, to stay calm and focused, but I'm glad I had an eight-shot lead on the 17th tee!

"I kept cool and calm the whole way but it's probably going to hit me tomorrow or next week what I've done."

Oosthuizen held a four-shot lead over Casey going into the final day, but his lead was down to three after a bogey on the eighth.

However, he then drove the green on the 352-yard ninth and holed from 40ft for an eagle - Casey made birdie to be four behind - before Casey suffered a triple bogey seven on the 12th to Oosthuizen's birdie three.

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