O’Lionaird knocked out in first heat of 1,500m race

O’Lionaird knocked out in first heat of 1,500m race

Irish athlete Ciaran O’Lionaird has failed to progress to the 1500m final at the World Indoor Track and Field Championships in Istanbul.

The Leevale AC runner finished 11th in heat one of the 1500m running after obtaining an indoor personal best of 3:50.12.

The race was won by Özbilen Ilham Tanui of Turkey in 3:41.93.

O’Lionaird was placed at the back of the field for the opening laps and lost form as he tried to push through the field.

The Cork man was a finalist at the World Outdoor Championships in Daegu last August and has also qualified for the London Olympic Games.

Next up for the Irish is Derval O’Rourke, also of Leevale AC, in the 60m Hurdles heats at 3pm Irish Time.

O’Rourke is in a highly competitive heat with many top athletes including World Outdoor champion Sally Pearson of Australia.

O’Rourke hasn’t competed in the World Indoors since 2006 when she won the Gold medal.

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