No snap decision on future from Monaghan's McEnaney

No snap decision on future from Monaghan's McEnaney

Yesterday's 1-15 to 1-11 All-Ireland qualifier defeat to Kildare could mark Seamus McEnaney's final game in charge of Monaghan, but the man himself was giving little away afterwards.

Monaghan's challenge for silverware this summer has collapsed in the space of just six days, with the Croke Park loss following on from last Sunday's disappointing Ulster final outing against Tyrone.

"It was a disappointing defeat for Monaghan, the performance again wasn't up to scratch," said McEnaney, reflecting on the Kildare game.

"A week is a long time in politics and a week in football is equally as long. It has been a very difficult week for Monaghan football, and it has been a bitter pill to swallow."

Understandably, given the swiftness of Monaghan's exit from this year's Championship, the Corduff clubman, who succeeded Colm Coyle as the county's manager in October 2004, does not want to make any rash decisions about his managerial future.

"Now is not the time for anyone - players or management - to be making big decisions. That will come in a few days' time," admitted McEnaney.

"I have spent six years at the helm here and they are a fantastic group of players that have given so much to Monaghan football.

"They have probably not achieved what they would have liked to achieve in terms of silverware, but they have certainly given Monaghan supporters a fantastic six years on the road and there is no reason why that group of fellas can't push on from there.

"I enjoyed my six years, they are a fantastic group of players and gave every ounce of energy in their bodies.

"The players have been very loyal to me. These fellas didn't even go out of the house last Sunday because of this game - that is the kind of commitment you are talking about.

"Tyrone absolutely turned the screw on us and to be beaten by ten points was a big disappointment; over the last six years only twice was this team beaten by more than four points, against Tyrone five years ago and last Sunday."

Kildare manager Kieran McGeeney, meanwhile, was delighted to see his side book their place in the last-eight of the All-Ireland Championship, albeit on the back of a less than convincing display.

"We were a bit stuttery in the first half and should have been five or six points clear at half-time, when it was only one (0-6 to 0-5)," he said.

"The fellas stuck at it, and it is a sign of mental resolve that they kept plugging away and started to pull away in the second half and were able to close the game out."

Man-of-the-match James Kavanagh, who top-scored with 0-5, was very pleased with his side's improved performance in the second half, having trailed by 0-4 to 0-1 early on.

"We were very happy with the way we came out in the second half, we improved a lot more," he said.

"We'll be disappointed with the last ten to 15 minutes though, we got sloppy. Myself and Alan (Smith) got sloppy inside, and instead of us kicking scores, Monaghan went down the pitch and kicked scores which put us under pressure.

"We'll have to address that, but overall I'm happy with the win."

He added: "The lads worked very hard outfield, which made it easier for me.

"In fairness to Monaghan, they weren't exactly flying, maybe it was because of their match last week.

"We seemed to have a lot of space inside, and I'm sure we won't have that the next day (in the quarter-final)."

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