Murphy: The HawkEye official was adamant it was a point

Murphy: The HawkEye official was adamant it was a point

The GAA’s HawkEye review official Dickie Murphy has confirmed the score detection technology employee on duty for Sunday’s All-Ireland SHC final twice analysed Brian Hogan’s catch before announcing the sliotar had passed his crossbar.

For the second game in a row — and the second time since HawkEye was introduced to the sport in Croke Park in 2013 — the system revealed Hogan had not been able to prevent the ball, on this latest occasion struck by John Donnelly in the 18th minute, from going over the bar for a point.

In the semi-final against Wexford and also at the Hill 16 end of the field, the Tipperary goalkeeper caught Lee Chin’s free and play developed leading to a Tipperary goal before the action was pulled back to reveal Chin’s shot had dissected the posts.

It has been argued HawkEye can only determine the trajectory of the sliotar/football but that is not the case, as has been stated by the company and now Murphy.

“For the regular HawkEye decision, there is the virtual post that extends above the real post and if it hits the virtual post, the plane of it, it’s wide,” opened the four-time All-Ireland SHC referee. “The crossbar was trialled as well because it’s probably the more difficult one to call.

Now it’s only happened twice in the Championship and both times to Brian Hogan. The TV commentators were able to listen to the referees last Sunday and if you look back Marty Morrissey mentioned HawkEye could about to be used.

“James (Owens) said to me after Brian caught the ball: ‘Are you checking it?’ and I said we were. The chap from HawkEye checked it and checked it again and the ball had gone over the plane of the bar. So that was the call made on that occasion as it was in the semi-final as well.

“The ability to find that out has been there ever since HawkEye was brought in. There’s a straight red line across and my reading of it is once it goes over that line, it’s a point. If it doesn’t, it’s not a point. The HawkEye official was adamant it was a point.

“The umpire is instructed in such situations not to put up a flag because if he does and we look at it and it’s seen that the ball didn’t cross the crossbar it’s difficult.

“When the ball comes in, the HawkEye official looks at the graphics and tells me straight away whether it’s a point or not. I look down at the umpire to make sure he is signalling correctly. If he isn’t, that’s when I make contact with him and the referee.”

Dalo's Final Podcast: Businesslike Tipp. Hogan's red. Hogan & Hawkeye, One-dimensional Cats?

Hogan himself felt there was no question that he kept out Donnelly’s strike from being a point on Sunday.

“I was fully sure it wasn’t over. I wasn’t even standing on the line — my arm didn’t even hit the crossbar. It definitely wasn’t over the bar. It (his arm) hit the crossbar the last day (v Wexford).”

As for the time it took to make the call, Murphy felt it was an improvement on the extended delay in the semi-final during which John McGrath had a goal disallowed. “I’m not saying we got it a lot quicker (than the semi-final) but it was quick enough. We had to make sure it was right because it was a big call. In fairness, in the semi-final if there wasn’t a goal at the other end there wouldn’t have been a big issue about time.”

He revealed Hogan was close to conceding a second such point in the second half on Sunday when he brought the sliotar down to himself with his hurley.

“That was very tight but that wasn’t a point. He (Hogan) is a big man.”

More on this topic

Rivals await fate on tiered championshipRivals await fate on tiered championship

'Next year is going to be huge': Éamonn Fitzmaurice says Kerry must capitalise on 'positive energy' 'Next year is going to be huge': Éamonn Fitzmaurice says Kerry must capitalise on 'positive energy'

This Dublin team now living in rare auld timesThis Dublin team now living in rare auld times

Gaelic football’s time to shine: Our writers and columnists highlightsGaelic football’s time to shine: Our writers and columnists highlights


More in this Section

Imagine a Conor Murray or James Ryan obliged to walk through pre-match drinkers outside pubs in Beggars BushImagine a Conor Murray or James Ryan obliged to walk through pre-match drinkers outside pubs in Beggars Bush

Arsenal were lucky not to lose at Watford – Bernd LenoArsenal were lucky not to lose at Watford – Bernd Leno

West Ham battle to draw at Aston Villa despite dismissal of Arthur MasuakuWest Ham battle to draw at Aston Villa despite dismissal of Arthur Masuaku

Jonny May tips England’s attack to cut through teams at the World CupJonny May tips England’s attack to cut through teams at the World Cup


Lifestyle

Make-up artist Terry Barber reveals the secret to pulling off the bold lip look.This is how to make black lipstick work in real life, according to a catwalk make-up pro

Off to the Japan? After a trip to Tokyo, Ella Walker outlines the best things to eat between matches.These are the dishes to try if you’re going to Tokyo for the Rugby World Cup

It still surprises me as I am achingly private and do not enjoy being at the centre of attention.This Much I Know: Actor Aislin McGuckin

Bride Geraldine O’Donovan felt as wonderful as she looked on her big day — knowing she was supporting a cause close to her heart as she donned her wedding gown.Wedding on the Week: Supporting a cause close to their hearts

More From The Irish Examiner