McGinley reveals Ryder Cup emotions

McGinley reveals Ryder Cup emotions

Paul McGinley has revealed how fans have reacted to Europe’s Ryder Cup victory at Gleneagles and his emotions at finally getting the chance to see highlights of the action.

McGinley’s leadership was widely praised after the five-point win over the United States on Sunday, but the Dubliner is not resting on his laurels this week.

The 47-year-old will contest the Dunhill Links Championship in Scotland along with four members of his victorious team in Rory McIlroy, Martin Kaymer, Victor Dubuisson and Stephen Gallacher.

McGinley spent relatively little time on the course watching his players last week, preferring to prepare for the next session and let his vice-captains monitor the action.

“I didn’t watch the TV any time. I didn’t have time for a start but I didn’t watch highlights or anything,” McGinley said. “When I went home on Monday and the girls were off doing their things and getting ready for school, my son Killian said ’The golf is on, the highlights are on, how The Ryder Cup was won’.

“So I went in and sat watching that for half an hour and straight away I got that sense of bonding and I could see the players’ body language with each other. I could see the way they were hanging out and hugging with each other. I could see the way they were communicating with each other. I could see the caddie involvement, the vice-captains being part of it. I could see the crowd interaction.

“And all of the things that I had not seen during the week, because I was so stuck in management mode, that half an hour of watching the highlights was probably the most emotional I’ve been all week, because that for me was confirmation of so many things I wanted summed up there in that half an hour of highlights.

“We nailed it. We nailed it as a team, that sense of bonding that the players had for each other. I could see it.”

McGinley, who also played on three winning Ryder Cup sides, added: “The reaction I’m getting from everybody is people are coming up to me and saying ’Thank you, thank you,’ rather than congratulations.

“That to me summarises everything I wanted he Ryder Cup to be. That sense of everybody feeling so connected with the team and we did a good job for them and that’s what makes it so special. If you won a tournament yourself, they would be saying congratulations. But they all were saying thank you.”

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