Man 'trusted and respected' by All Blacks charged in dressing room 'bug' case

Man 'trusted and respected' by All Blacks charged in dressing room 'bug' case

Police have charged a security consultant with public mischief after an investigation into allegations a listening device was planted in the New Zealand rugby union team's meeting room in a Sydney hotel before a Test match.

New South Wales state police issued a statement saying the 51-year-old man would appear in a Sydney local court on March 21.

New Zealand management discovered the listening device on Monday, August 15, but reportedly did not notify police for five days - with news emerging on the morning of the Bledisloe Cup match.

At the time, New Zealand Rugby said a device similar to that used by law enforcement and spy agencies was found in a chair in the room, which was being used for sensitive tactical and planning discussions.

New Zealand won the match 42-8.

All Blacks coach Steve Hansen, in a statement, said the charge "seems bizarre and unbelievable".

Hansen said the man who was charged worked for the All Blacks and "is someone who is trusted and well respected by us".

"However, as with all cases before the courts, there has to be a due process ... and it is not right or proper for us to make any further comment as this could jeopardise the outcome of the case."

The man has been identified as Adrian Gard, a director of Brisbane-based security and investigations company Bodyguards International.

The company has worked for the All Blacks in Australia for more than 10 years and has had other high-profile clients including former US president Bill Clinton, Tiger Woods and Oprah Winfrey.

Gard could face up to 12 months in prison if convicted.

The charges provided some closure in the case, Australian Rugby Union chief executive Bill Pulver said in a statement.

"The ARU and the Wallabies were never accused of any wrongdoing, however, it was still important that this matter reached a conclusion to provide complete reassurance to all fans that the organisation and the team had no part in any of this," Mr Pulver said.

"There may be some questions that remain but certainly today's news is welcome news that an individual has been called to account over this incident."

More in this Section

Behind-closed-doors games cleared for TV after UEFA lifts Saturday 3pm blackoutBehind-closed-doors games cleared for TV after UEFA lifts Saturday 3pm blackout

The Ryan game: “Proud” Trent pays for poor finishing in FIFA 20 defeatThe Ryan game: “Proud” Trent pays for poor finishing in FIFA 20 defeat

Club player of the year McGrath adjusting to life on lockdownClub player of the year McGrath adjusting to life on lockdown

Sport's frontline workers: ‘We’re in a privileged position to help in a global pandemic’Sport's frontline workers: ‘We’re in a privileged position to help in a global pandemic’


Lifestyle

With documentary film ‘Fantastic Fungi’ set to take the world by storm, Joe McNamee looks at the fabulous world of mushroomsDocumentary explores the magic of mushrooms

I lead a very busy life — I’m a mature student in college — and I separated from my partner but the separation was my decision. I hate myself when it beckons as it ultimately makes me fatter, it has the reverse effectDear Louise: I had my bulimia under control. But the demon has returned

This year has been particularly difficult and stressful, and I think that’s an even more important reason to make time for your health.Derval O'Rourke: Resistance is far from futile and necessary

Best-selling author Faith Hogan is keeping the faith during the lockdown, thanks to her Moy Valley haven in Ballina, Co Mayo.Shape I'm in: Keeping the Faith during lockdown

More From The Irish Examiner