Limini makes quick return in Guinness Handicap at Galway

Limini makes quick return in Guinness Handicap at Galway
Uradel (right) crosses the line to win the Connacht Hotel (Q.R.) Handicap ahead of second place Limini at the Galway Races in Ballybrit on Monday. Pic: Seb Daly/Sportsfile

Limini is back in action just four days after her comeback in the Guinness Handicap at Galway on Friday.

Willie Mullins' talented dual-purpose mare was having her first run for over 500 days on the opening night of the Festival.

All looked to be going swimmingly for most of the race until stable companion Uradel swept past in the final furlong and she was beaten by a length and a half.

"I think she's gone up 11lb for the other night but she gets to run in this off her old mark," said assistant trainer Patrick Mullins, who rode her on Tuesday but now makes way for Kevin Manning.

"Obviously it is not ideal to be running back so quickly after a long lay-off but she seems to have come out of the race in great form so we'll let her take her chance.

"This is only a mile and a half compared to two miles the other night, but she travelled so well for me that night and shows a lot of speed at home that I don't think that will be an issue at all.

"The way the ground is riding now and with the uphill finish, that should suit her."

The yard also run Law Girl, Nessun Dorma and top weight Gustavus Vassa, with Mullins jnr sweet on the chances of the latter.

"I think the ground has probably gone against Law Girl but while Gustavas Vassa might have top weight, he could still be ahead of his mark," said Patrick Mullins.

"He's been unfortunate to bump into Sea The Lion - a real improving horse - the last twice and the pair of them have pulled a long way clear of the rest in their last two races.

"So, while he's got all that weight, there could be more to come. Danny (Mullins) is on board and rides the track as well as anyone, and if Limini is not firing on all cylinders he might be one to take advantage."

Gavin Cromwell's three-year-old Princess Yaiza was not far behind subsequent Irish Oaks winner Sea Of Class at Newbury last time.

Cromwell said: "A reproduction of her Newbury run, or even Chester, where she was behind the Ribblesdale winner (Magic Wand), would give her a great chance.

"It's hard for a three-year-old taking on the older horses but I think the soft ground and stiff finish are in her favour."

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