Jonathan Sexton says fear factor makes Michael Cheika a success

Jonathan Sexton says fear factor makes Michael Cheika a success

The secret to Michael Cheika’s success with Australia lies in his ability to scare the wits out of his Wallabies, according to Johnny Sexton.

Where straight-laced Stuart Lancaster keeps England on a tight leash and governs by process, Ireland fly-half Sexton revealed Cheika rules by fear – but backs that up with deep-thinking insight and shrewd coaching acumen.

Insipid England bombed out of their home World Cup just 16 days into the tournament, blitzed 33-13 at Twickenham by Cheika’s rampant Wallabies on Saturday night.

Lancaster is now fighting for his future, while former Leinster and Waratahs boss Cheika is riding high, less than a year into his first Test-level assignment.

Jonathan Sexton says fear factor makes Michael Cheika a success

When asked why Cheika is such a proficient coach, Leinster pivot Sexton replied: “Because everyone’s probably scared s***tless of him, if I was being honest!

“He knows his rugby as well, he’s a very clever guy but he does have that presence where he’s a pretty scary guy when you get on the wrong side of him.”

Cheika guided Leinster to their first-ever Heineken Cup title in 2008, with Sexton to the fore in that campaign.

The pair have kept in regular contact, just as the affable but focused Cheika seems to have managed with the majority of players he has ever coached.

Sexton hailed Australia as one of the new World Cup favourites after their fine early-campaign form, while also admitting he will aim to meet up with Cheika once the tournament comes to a close.

“I was texting him last week. I still send the odd text to him,” said Sexton.

“He wished me luck at the start of the World Cup and I was the same.

“We’ve always got on very well and I was delighted to see him, he’s proved what a good coach he is.

“He’s turned around Leinster, he’s turned around New South Wales and now he’s turned around Australia.

“They look like a really formidable team, they look like one of the favourites to go on and win the World Cup now.

“So fair play to him and hopefully I can catch up with him after the World Cup.”

More on this topic

Jacob Stockdale hoping for more good memories of Twickenham in bid for World Cup placeJacob Stockdale hoping for more good memories of Twickenham in bid for World Cup place

WADA compliments Rugby World Cup for zero failed drug tests

Stuart Lancaster steps down as England head coach 'by mutual consent'Stuart Lancaster steps down as England head coach 'by mutual consent'

VIDEO: Why the Rugby World Cup 2015 was the greatest rugby tournament everVIDEO: Why the Rugby World Cup 2015 was the greatest rugby tournament ever

More in this Section

Talking points ahead of Scotland’s Six Nations match with ItalyTalking points ahead of Scotland’s Six Nations match with Italy

No containment plan to stop Grealish, insists Southampton boss HasenhuttlNo containment plan to stop Grealish, insists Southampton boss Hasenhuttl

Jones backs England to stand up to Ireland's aerial assaultJones backs England to stand up to Ireland's aerial assault

'We've made a hell of a lot of mistakes' - Aston Villa boss Smith wants team to improve focus and concentration'We've made a hell of a lot of mistakes' - Aston Villa boss Smith wants team to improve focus and concentration


Lifestyle

They differ from the more prevalent oranges we eat because their flesh, and often the skin, is crimson or deep red in colour.Michelle Darmody: The best time of year to buy blood oranges

The annual Members Exhibition now underway at the Lavit Gallery in Cork features 92 works from 72 artists.The exhibition runs until March 7.Under the hammer: Your guide to upcoming auctions

There’s an oriental theme at the James Adam ‘At Home’ auction in Dublin, says Des O’SullivanAuctions: Sale full of eastern promise

Sales of artisan sourdough bread are on the rise. It's all very well if you're happy to pay for a chewy substantial loaf but does it have any real health benefits? Áilín Quinlan talks to the expertsFlour power: The rise and rise of sourdough bread

More From The Irish Examiner