Irish Olympic boss hopeful that IOC will conclude Hickey investigation before Tokyo 2020

Irish Olympic boss hopeful that IOC will conclude Hickey investigation before Tokyo 2020
Pat Hickey

The Olympic Federation of Ireland (OFI) is hopeful that the International Olympic Council's (IOC) investigation into Pat Hickey and the Rio 2016 ticketing scandal will be completed before the Tokyo Games in 2020.

A copy of the Moran Report, which delved into into the ticketing issue, was sent to the IOC's Ethics Commission almost two years ago and OFI president Sarah Keane expressed the wish last month that the body's work would be completed before the next Games in Japan.

Hickey's situation has been uncertain since Rio.

Arrested and held in custody in Brazil three years ago, there has been no progress on his case through the Brazilian judicial system since his return to Ireland and he remains on a self-imposed suspension from the IOC and its various affiliate branches.

“He continues to be self-suspended from any role or function within the Olympic movement,” explained Keane at the organisation's AGM at the National Sports Council in Dublin on Thursday night.

Whilst we do not know what will happen with his case in Brazil, I do think that it is potentially likely that something will happen at International Olympic Committee level, presumably through the IOC Ethics Commission, prior to the Tokyo Games.

"I can't say any more than that but we will manage the situation as best we can.”

Keane also reiterated her understanding that Hickey will hold no official role at the upcoming European Games in Minsk.

The former Olympic Council of Ireland president has been invited to Belarus by the European Olympic Council, a body which he has served as president. Hickey was also a driving force in instigating the European Games concept.

“We have been assured that he will have no role or function at the European Games and the International Olympic Committee have indicated to us that their position regarding our former president remains unchanged,” Keane confirmed.

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