Irish boxing trainer Brendan Ingle dies aged 77

Highly respected Irish boxing trainer Brendan Ingle has died at the age of 77.

The Dubliner became one of the fight scene's most influential figures during a decorated career in which he trained four world champions, including Naseem Hamed and Johnny Nelson.

His gym in Wincobank, Sheffield, continues to thrive with his sons Dominic and John having assumed control.

He passed away in his sleep early this morning, at Royal Hallamshire hospital, the British Boxing Board of Control has confirmed.

Ingle initially established the Ingle Gym to provide a place for young people to train, and was made an MBE in 1998 for his services and contributions to boxing and for his work with young people in Sheffield.

Ingle's success and that of his fighters owed much to his unique methods. If not the highest profile, Nelson perhaps represents Ingle's biggest success in the way he was transformed into a world champion having lost his first three fights.

Nelson was among those to pay tribute to Dublin-born Ingle.

"A good, good man has left this earth today," Nelson said on social media. "A good friend. A good father figure. And the best trainer in the world."

Dave Coldwell, another of Britain's leading trainers, said: "The man that started me off on the road to where I am. He changed so many lives that were going nowhere and did so much for the sport of boxing in the UK. Thoughts with his family, friends and all the fighters he worked with."

British heavyweight Tony Bellew said: "Brendan Ingle has left a legacy that very few can ever compare to, so sad."

Frank Warren, who promoted Hamed while he was trained by Ingle, said: "Deepest condolences to (wife) Alma and the Ingle family after the passing of trainer and mentor Brendan.

"Boxing has lost a legend and I will look back fondly on the many great moments we shared together in the sport. RIP my friend."


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