Ireland too strong for Papua New Guinea in Twenty20 Opener

Ireland too strong for Papua New Guinea in Twenty20 Opener

Ireland kicked off their preparations for next month’s World Twenty20 with a comprehensive five-wicket win over Papua New Guinea in the first T20 international at Townsville.

William Porterfield’s side reached the victory target of 93 with 47 balls to spare on the back of Surrey wicketkeeper-batsman Gary Wilson’s 45 off 33 deliveries.

Papua New Guinea never recovered after losing openers Lega Siaka and Vani Morea with just two runs on the board.

Craig Young, Andy McBrine and Kevin O’Brien each took two wickets as Ireland limited Papua New Guinea to 92 for nine from their 20 overs.

Ireland slumped to 30 for three in reply but Wilson took control to get his side within sight of victory, which was confirmed by an O’Brien maximum.

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